Posts tagged ‘Morrissey’

MORRISSEY | Satellite of Love (Video)


Morrissey sung a cover of The Velvet Underground/Lou Reed classic “Satellite of Love” — a song about a lover’s betrayal — at this year’s Glastonbury festival. Interestingly enough, the backdrop behind the band is a still image from Mauro Bolognini’s film “Senilità” (also called “Careless”). The actor is Anthony Franciosa. It’s basically a grey and beautiful film about unrequited love and yes, betrayal — two very familiar Morrissey themes. Thanks to TwentyFourBit blog for the heads up about the cover. It’s a pretty rendition. The user Ermm has posted a number of very nice video from the show, including a bang-up version of “Meat Is Murder”, new tracks “People Are the Same Everywhere” and “Action Is My Middle Name”, along with some classics like “This Charming Man” and “There Is a Light That Never Goes Out”. Morrissey and his band sound in great form. On a side note, if you want to know why small music blogs are taking over, read the UK Guardian review of Morrissey’s show. The reviewer calls Morrissey’s last song, “William, It Was Really Nothing”, vigorous. So, what’s the problem? Well, that song wasn’t on the set list. And the last song of the night was “This Charming Man.” Oops. For shame. Indeed, it must have really sounded like Morrissey was getting “William, It Was Really Nothing” all wrong.  – David D. Robbins Jr.

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June 25, 2011 at 3:08 am Leave a comment

MORRISSEY | New Tracks

Former Smiths frontman Morrissey has three new tracks he unveiled live at Maida Vale Studios for BBC Radio 2 to kick off a new tour which begins in Perth, Australia tomorrow. The songs are posted at YouTube by a user “sdsuedehead”. The rollicking rocker, “The Kid’s A Looker”, begins with this classic Morrissey verse: “He can’t dance or sing / He can’t do anything, but what the hell?”, and continues with a line about crass consumers lining up shoulder to shoulder. “Action is My Middle Name” is a morbid piano ballad that would have made 17th-century British poet Andrew Marvell proud, the song lyrics expressing an urgency like “To His Coy Mistress”: “Writing my initials into your neck / You are my possession, you don’t realize yet / Am I moving too fast for you? / Am I beginning to confuse you? / Action is my middle name / I can’t waste time anymore.” Morrissey’s third track, “People Are the Same Everywhere”, is another missive, this time aimed at country and god, “Then our creator had to stumble and stall / And our creator had to make the biggest mistake of all / Set me aside and find people are the same everywhere … / Land of the free and the home of the brave exists nowhere / Here in our loveless nation, we’re all in a rush / To find a lover’s touch / And when it’s found you wonder why it meant so much.” I’ll have to spend more time with these cuts, but there are moments of typically wonderful Morrissey lyricism. – David D. Robbins Jr.

The Kid’s A Looker

People Are The Same Everywhere

Action Is My Middle Name

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June 14, 2011 at 8:08 pm Leave a comment

MORRISSEY | Glamorous Glue

Okay, so this is just a two-track CD/7-inch release, featuring the previously-released, “Glamorous Glue”, remastered from Morrissey’s “Your Arsenal” — and the other is a previously unreleased demo called “Treat Me Like a Human Being”, that’s been floating around the internet under the title, “Treat Me Like A New York Doll”. It’s easy to see why the latter of the two songs never made it onto “Viva Hate” — because it’s fairly middling. It’s a song that drifts along, lyrically and musically, with a sort of aimlessness. Morrissey’s vocals are pretty as always, and the refrain is melodic enough. The slow drums and sitar give it a weightless quality, but it feels about as impassioned as mushy papier-mâché.

But I didn’t create this post to rip an officially-released demo. Many Morrissey fans, despite their love for his music, groan under their breath when they hear of yet another “Best of” or the release of a remastered old track. But this one seems different to me. Morrissey doesn’t act without some reason behind it. And the release of “Glamorous Glue”, which had only been issued in the U.S. officially until now, coincides with a trend I’ve been writing about lately in music: Disillusionment in one’s country. Both PJ Harvey, and Morrissey seem to be suggesting a need for revival. A revival of culture, of connection, of life and humanity. PJ’s newest record, “Let England Shake”, finds her singing of barren, apocalyptic lands and augmenting her music with the ironic fanfare of an old-English fox hunt.

Now here’s Morrissey selecting “Glamorous Glue” (which is a great track by the way) from all the songs in his catalog, a song that thrashes London as much as any he’s written. And the album art is an old photo of himself in an England t-shirt, dripping wonderfully with unctuousness — Morrissey’s look suggesting he knows something we don’t. Let’s not forget the lyrics of the track: “Everyone lies, nobody minds / Everyone lies / Where is the man you respect? /And where is the woman you love? … / I used to dream, and I used to vow / I wouldn’t dream of it now / We look to Los Angeles /For the language we use / London is dead … / I know I’ll go empty hand, from the land.” It’s not too far removed from PJ’s “The Glorious Land”, where she mixes criticism of war with judgement on the future of a nation: “How is our glorious country sown? / Not with wheat and corn / What is the glorious fruit of our land? / Its fruit is deformed children.” Take heed from two of the world’s greatest musicians. Take action. Live to love. A rush and a push and the land is ours. – David D. Robbins Jr.

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May 4, 2011 at 12:34 am Leave a comment

THE SMITHS | The Demos (Bootleg Vinyl)

Article & artwork by David D. Robbins Jr. | The Smiths ‘Demos’

find long book introductions tedious. So, I won’t bore you with a history of The Smiths, or how they were one of the greatest bands on the planet. Chances are if you’re reading this far, then you already love the band. As many Smiths fans already know, a digital version of a bootleg vinyl appeared online in the Morrissey-Solo fan forum. It’s a quality find for those that have never heard it before. I’ve had the vinyl for a little while now, and understand what a treasure this is. I’ve read a few things online that have focused on what is being labeled a ‘reggae version’ of “Girlfriend In a Coma”. But as a longtime Smiths obsessive, the real find for me, was the version of “Death of a Disco Dancer”. Yes, it happens to be my favorite Smiths song. But it’s also a chance to hear a work in progress of one of the band’s best songs. It’s beautiful in its lo-fi format, but the demo makes it easier to see how much the song blossomed. Here is my track-by-track look at the recently posted Smiths demos. Read it and enjoy. (Sorry David Cameron, you’re not allowed, as ordered by the band.) You can click on the song titles and it will take you to a YouTube post of the tracks, excepting the last instrumental.

1. The Hand That Rocks the Cradle
Song is nearly exact to the version we’re all familiar with. What will make Smiths fans happy is to hear that Morrissey’s voice is so good even when putting together a demo. Hardly surprising, but refreshing given the amount of vocal altering that goes on today. His voice is an unfolding elegance. When I first heard this the opening guitar riff jumped out at me as reminiscent of the kind of style you’d hear on Lou Reed’s “A Walk On the Wild Side”. I think music writer Simon Goddard is spot on in saying the lyrics are even more poetic than usual. It doesn’t get any more darkly romantic: “Wavering shadows loom / A piano plays in an empty room / There’ll be blood on the cleaver tonight / And when darkness lifts and the room is bright / I’ll still be by your side / For you are all that matters.” Or quietly say this phrase to yourself: “Ceiling shadows shimmy by …” It’s silky slide is magic on the tongue.

A look at 15 more tracks

December 25, 2010 at 1:20 am Leave a comment

BONA DRAG (20th Aniv. Ed.) | Morrissey

Article/artwork: David D. Robbins Jr.
(Art uses photo from Morrissey’s official website)
Album: Bona Drag (20th Anniversary Edition w/bonus tracks)

THE ELEGANT MILLER OF MOPE: It’s an understatement to say Morrissey has a way with words. He is their lion-tamer. Perhaps more-so than any other musician this side of Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen. Twenty years ago, the former lead singer of The Smiths released his first solo compilation of outtakes, b-sides and singles, called “Bona Drag”. The album title means “good clothes” in polari slang, a secret style of speech, codifying conversations among people in the gay subculture, during a time when homosexuality was a criminal offense in Britain. So, the album begins as a wink-and-a-nod to those in the know, so-to-speak.

Nearly every song Morrissey has ever sung is rich with subtext. His debonair singing style, elongating syllables and stretching words like a verbal contortionist, often prettifies the fiery emotional scales of Morrissey’s lyrics. His style is deliberately effusive in everything — love, hate, angst, feelings of loneliness, betrayal, friendship, disgust — even in his tragicomic verses. His lyricism is enigmatic, showcasing a razor-sharp sense of humor, sometimes a petty meanness, gentility like a flower, a curiosity for the violent, an erudite enjoyment for literary witticism, and an exquisitely romantic love for beautiful sentences. The opening track, “Piccadilly Palare”, is nostalgic, remembering a time with his “gang” of boys would carouse, speaking to each other in a slang only their crew could understand.
… article continues, video

October 11, 2010 at 4:23 am Leave a comment


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